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A Reminder from Megan Auman: You’re Not Cheap—And Neither is Running Your Business

by Tara Gentile
craft & maker, money & life

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Have you downloaded the first episodes of CreativeLive’s new podcast with me, Tara Gentile? If you haven’t, you’re missing out on mic-drop moments from Chase Jarvis, Sue Bryce, and the one and only Megan Auman. In Episode 3, it’s all about must-hear business advice.

With all the talk about how cheap it is to start a business today, it seems like that old adage “you have to spend money to make money” has gone the way of the fax machine. And, it’s true that you can put up a website and offer your product or service for next to nothing.

Yet, it’s also true that once you get started you realize the copious amount of ways you could be spending money: a designer, a virtual assistant, a trade show, an advertising account, a coach, etc… Even the little subscriptions add up fast.

I know many creative and idea-driven business owners who decry the expenses associated with running their businesses. But it seems successful business owners figure out how to not only become comfortable spending money to make money but become excited at the prospect of investing in themselves.

Megan Auman, designer, educator, and metalsmith, is one of those successful creative business owners. I’ve always been impressed with Megan’s investment mindset and her ability to quickly make decisions about spending money (and even using debt) in order to further the goals of her business.

Megan has never been attracted to doing things the cheap way. She’d rather get results and get them fast by making investments in quality tools, materials, and opportunities.

When you listen to my interview with Megan, take special note of  all of the factors that go into making an investment decision. Spending money is fun—but it has to be smart, too.

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Tara Gentile

Tara Gentile is a creativeLIVE instructor, business strategist, and the creator of the Customer Perspective Process.